Fortieth Annual

2001

Saint Louis University


Officers

President: Olivia Remie Constable, Notre Dame University
Vice-president: Leah Shopkow, Indiana University
Secretary: Richard Ring, University of Kansas
Treasurer: Martin Arbagi, Wright State University
Councilors: Mark Angelos, Manchester College; Richard Sullivan, Michigan State University.
Program Director: Thomas Burman,
University of Tennessee
Local Arrangements: Thomas F. Madden, Saint Louis University


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Program

 

All sessions meet in the Pere Marquette Room.

 

Friday, October 19, 2001  

2:00 p.m.        Registration Begins.  Pere Marquette Room.

2:30 - 4:00      Graduate Student Session I

Chair: David T. Murphy, Director, Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Saint Louis University

Jacob ben Reubenís Sefer Milhamot Hashem and Nicholas of Lyra
Joshua Levy,
New York University

Jewish Royal Officials in Thirteenth-Century Hungary
James T. Wilson,
Indiana University
 

In Court . . . and Out: The Interaction of Christians and Jews in Thirteenth-Century England
Frances Howard Mitilineos,
Loyola University, Chicago
 

4:15 - 5:45     Graduate Student Session II

Chair: Larry J. Simon, University of Western Michigan

The Fourth Lateran Council, Relics, and the Fourth Crusade
David Perry,
University of Minnesota

History, Heroic Poetry, and Hagiography: Saint George and the Fall of Jerusalem in the Legenda Aurea
James B. MacGregor, University of Cincinnati  

The Conceptual Origins of Juan de Segoviaís Contraferentia of Christians and Muslims
Anne Marie Wolf, University
of Minnesota

8:00 - 10:00     Cocktail Reception.  Cheshire Inn, Windsor Room.  

Sponsored by the Saint Louis University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

   

Saturday, October 20, 2001  

8:00 a.m          Registration and Continental Breakfast. Pere Marquette Room.

8:45 a.m.         Welcome

Joe Weixlmann, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Saint Louis University

9:00 - 10:30     Religion and Society in Early Medieval Europe

Chair: Thomas F. X. Noble, University of Notre Dame

Christian Morality and Judicial Process: The Early Medieval Exemplar of Susanna
Kevin Uhalde, Northern Illinois
University
 

Hereticising the Jew in the Adversus Iudaeos of Amulo, Bishop of Lyon
Abigail Firey,
University of Kentucky
 

The Visio Baronti, the Book of Tobias, and Charles the Bald
John Contreni, Purdue
University

10:30 - 10:45     Coffee Break.

10:45 - 12:15     Plenary Address

Medieval Studies and the Persistent Notion of Historical Progress

Paul Freedman, Yale University

12:30 - 2:00       Business Lunch.  Knights Room, Pius XII Library.  

2:00 - 2:30         Exhibitions in the Vatican Film Library and St. Louis
                            Room.

2:30 - 4:00       Religion and Society in the Medieval Mediterranean

Chair: Philip R. Gavitt, Saint Louis University

Gender Under Siege: Women and Femininity in Besieged Communities in Late-Medieval Iberia
Marta VanLandingham,
Purdue University

Christian and Muslim Marriage in Islamic Spain before 1000
Jessica Coope,
University of Nebraska , Lincoln
 

Cassianís Memory of Egypt and the Archaelogical Remains of Monastic Sites
Darlene L. Brooks-Hedstrom, Wittenberg
University

4:00 - 4:15         Coffee Break  

4:15 - 5:45         Defining Sanctity in the High Middle Ages

Chair: Phyllis Pobst, Arkansas State University

Plague, Saints, and Charity: Definitions of Religious Power and Communal Boundaries in the Medieval Near East
Alexandra Cuffel, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
State University
 

St. Francis the Preacher and His Audience
Kenneth Baxter Wolf, Pomona
College

Two Sermons by Bernat Oliver OESA on Sanctity
Blake R. Beattie,
University of Louisville
 

6:00                   Cocktails.  Cupples House.  

7:00                   Banquet.  Cook Hall.  

9:00                   Presidentís Reception. Cheshire Inn.


Meeting Minutes

The beautiful urban campus of Saint Louis University served as the site for the 40th annual meeting of the Midwest Medieval History Conference on October 19th and 20th, 2001.  All of us in attendance last year again thank our gracious host, Thomas Madden, and his staff, for their hard work in providing us with excellent accommodations and refreshments.   

Thanks also go to our Program Chair, Thomas Burman (of the University of Tennessee), for putting together a rich and rewarding series of papers that carried us through a stimulating weekend of medieval studies.

Friday afternoon found us in the elegant Pere Marquette Room where we enjoyed two panels of graduate student papers.

In the first session:

Joshua Levy, of New York University, discussed Jacob ben Reubenís Sefer Milhamot Hashem and Nicholas of Lyra.

James T. Wilson, of Indiana University, shared his research on Jewish Royal Officials in 13th-Century Hungary.

And Frances Howard Mitilineos, of Loyola University, Chicago, presented the paper, In Court Ö and Out: The Interaction of Christians and Jews in 13th-Century England.

In the second session that day:

David Perry, of the University of Minnesota, discussed The Fourth Lateran Council, Relics, and the Fourth Crusade.

James B. MacGregor, of the University of Cincinnati, presented History, Heroic Poetry, and Hagiography: Saint George and the Fall of Jerusalem in the Legenda Aurea.

And Anne Marie Wolf, of the University of Minnesota, shared her research on The Conceptual Origins of Juan de Segoviaís Contraferentia of Christians and Muslims.

After dinner, we reconvened for a Cocktail Reception at the Cheshire Innís Windsor Room sponsored by the Saint Louis University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

Thanks, in part, to the exceptional hospitality of Saint Louis Universityís fine graduate students, Saturday morning seemed to arrive quite early for some of us.  Nevertheless, we enjoyed a hearty welcome in the Pere Marquette Room from Joe Weixlmann, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Saint Louis University.

The first session, entitled Religion and Society in Early Medieval Europe began with: 

Kevin Uhalde, of Northern Illinois University, presenting Christian Morality and Judicial Process: The Early Medieval Exemplar of Susanna. 

Abigail Firey, of the University of Kentucky, then discussed Hereticising the Jew in the Adversus Iudaeos of Amulo, Bishop of Lyon. 

And finally, John Contreni, of Purdue University, presented his research concerning The Visio Baronti, the Book of Tobias, and Charles the Bald. 

After a coffee break, conference members thoroughly enjoyed the Plenary Address delivered by

Paul Freedman, of Yale University, on the topic: Medieval Studies and the Persistent Notion of Historical Progress.

There followed the Business Lunch in the Knights Room of Saint Louis Universityís Pius XII Library.  After a fine meal, President Olivia Remie Constable, of the University of Notre Dame, called the meeting to order.

Martin Arbagi, of Wright State University, delivered the Treasurerís Report, leading a general discussion of our conference treasure and the measure of its income and increasing outflow.  In this report we also learned of the fluctuating status of this conference as a non-profit organization.

Richard Ring, of the University of Kansas, then produced his ultimate report as conference secretary of long standing on the 39th Annual Meeting held at Wittenberg University in Ohio.

Conference members then elected officers:

Leah Shopkow, of Indiana University, as President; Louis Haas, of Middle Tennessee State University, as Vice-President and President-Elect; Martin Arbagi, Wright State University, continuing as Treasurer; Mark Angelos, of Manchester College, as Secretary; Richard E. Sullivan, of Michigan State University, continuing in the second year of his term as Counselor; and Linda Mitchell, of Alfred University, to begin the first year of her two-year term as Counselor.

Proceeding to further business, conference members discussed whether we still maintained membership in CARA, the coordinating body of regional medieval associations.  Our representative, Jim Murray, of the University of Cincinnati, promised to settle this question.

In acknowledgement of the 40th anniversary of our august body, we took great pleasure in recognizing the three original members there present:

Richard Kay, of the University of Kansas; Richard E. Sullivan, of Michigan State University; and R. Dean Ware, of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Finally, we announced future meetings:

In 2002, the conference to be held at Indiana University with Leah Shopkow, host and Linda Mitchell, program chair.

In 2003, the conference to be held at the University of Notre Dame, with Olivia Remie Constable, host, and the program chair to be determined.

After luncheon, conference members enjoyed an interesting tour of Saint Louis Universityís Library, in particular exhibitions of the Vatican Film Library and manuscripts in the St. Louis Room.

The first afternoon session, entitled Religion and Society in the Medieval Mediterranean began with:

Marta VanLandingham, of Purdue University, delivering her paper Gender Under Siege: Women and Femininity in Besieged Communities in Late-Medieval Iberia.

Next we heard Jessica Coope, of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, discuss Christian and Muslim Marriage in Islamic Spain before 1000.

To end the session, Darlene L. Brooks-Hedstrom, of Wittenberg University, presented Cassianís Memory of Egypt and the Archaeological Remains of Monastic Sites.

After coffee, we turned to our next session: Defining Sanctity in the High Middle Ages.

To begin, Alexandra Cuffel, of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, presented her paper, Ideas About Sanctity: Christian, Jewish, and Muslim in the Medieval Near East.

And to end the session, Kenneth Baxter Wolf, of Pomona College, discussed St. Francis the Preacher and His Audience.

The conference closed its proceeding with revivifying cocktails at the lovely Cupples House, a fortifying banquet at Cook Hall, and a generous and intellectually stimulating Reception at Cheshire Inn, hosted by President Constable.


Lore

After the banquet the conference attendees were treated to the recollections of three scholars who helped to found the conference in 1962.  R. Dean Ware (University of Massachusetts, Amherst), Skip Kay (University of Kansas), and Richard Sullivan (Michigan State University) delighted everyone with their stories of warm friendship and collegiality.


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